Webinars

Register today to participate in a variety of live, interactive seminars with ARI experts.

Date Speaker Description Registration
October 16 6:30 PM ET

Onkar Ghate

Gregory Salmieri

Seminar in Ayn Rand’s Political Philosophy:
The Basic Principle of Political Philosophy: Individual Rights

“The concept of individual rights is so new in human history,” Ayn Rand writes, “that most men have not grasped it fully to this day.” This session will explore Rand’s understanding of this concept, including why the principle of individual rights is necessary to properly subordinate society to moral law and why it is indispensable to establishing political freedom.

Core reading: Rand’s article “Man’s Rights” (reprinted in The Virtue of Selfishness and in Capitalism: The Unknown Ideal)

Register Now Register Now
October 18 6:30 PM ET

Onkar Ghate

Gregory Salmieri

Seminar in Ayn Rand’s Political Philosophy:
Government as the Means of Securing Individual Rights

To secure and protect the rights of the individual, Rand argues, the use of physical force (of coercion) must be placed under objective control. This is the only proper role of government. This session will explore Rand’s understanding of government, including what she thinks are its proper functions, why she thinks the initiation of physical force is a unique evil, and why she thinks all societies that lack objective government, from dictatorships to mixed economies to anarchy, are incompatible with political freedom.

Core reading: Rand’s article “The Nature of Government” (reprinted in The Virtue of Selfishness and in Capitalism: The Unknown Ideal)

Register Now Register Now
October 23 6:30 PM ET

Onkar Ghate

Gregory Salmieri

Seminar in Ayn Rand’s Political Philosophy:
The Moral Foundations of Capitalism

Rand maintains that “if one wishes to advocate a free society . . . one must realize that its indispensable foundation is the principle of individual rights. If one wishes to uphold individual rights, one must realize that capitalism is the only system that can uphold and protect them.” This session will explore Rand’s distinctive account of the moral foundations of capitalism, including its rejection of collectivism and tribalism, its embrace of reason and production, and its legal protections of property rights and the right to disagree.

Core reading: first half of Rand’s essay “What Is Capitalism?” (reprinted in Capitalism: The Unknown Ideal)

Register Now Register Now
October 25 6:30 PM ET

Onkar Ghate

Gregory Salmieri

Seminar in Ayn Rand’s Political Philosophy:
The Objectivity of the Free Market

A proper government, by securing the rights of the individual and placing the use of physical force under objective control, creates a free market. The functioning of a free market, Rand argues, is ruled by the principle of objectivity. This session will explore Rand’s unique philosophical analysis of the operations of a free market, in terms both of the objectivity of knowledge and the objectivity of values.

Core reading: second half of Rand’s essay “What Is Capitalism?” (reprinted in Capitalism: The Unknown Ideal)

Register Now Register Now
October 30 6:30 PM ET

Onkar Ghate

Gregory Salmieri

Seminar in Ayn Rand’s Political Philosophy:
A Deeper Look at Property Rights

A crucial task of government in a free society, Rand argues, is to recognize and uphold property rights as individual citizens create new property and invent new forms of property. This session will explore Rand’s discussion of some of the political-legal principles that should guide government in performing this vital function.

Core reading: “The Property Status of Airwaves” and “Patents and Copyrights” (reprinted in Capitalism: The Unknown Ideal)

Register Now Register Now
November 01 6:30 PM ET

Onkar Ghate

Gregory Salmieri

Seminar in Ayn Rand’s Political Philosophy:
Intellectual Freedom and the Right to Disagree

The fight for freedom, Rand argues, began with and had to begin with the demand for the right to freedom of thought, to intellectual freedom. This session will explore Rand’s perspective on intellectual freedom, including freedom of speech and censorship, and will consider why Rand maintains that “intellectual freedom cannot exist without political freedom; political freedom cannot exist without economic freedom; a free mind and a free market are corollaries.”

Core readings: selected excerpts from Rand’s articles

Register Now Register Now